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A More Honest Love Story

Creators seem to love Netflix’s tendency to grant creators greater freedoms than traditional cable networks, and their subscribers love it too. With so much discussion surrounding Netflix originals like “Stranger Things,” “Sense 8,” and “Orange is the New Black,” it’s no surprise that a “handsoff” approach is effective. The second season of the Netflix original “Love” is no different. “Love” portrays a more honest story of courtship, without using tired archetypes found in every other romantic comedy I’ve seen. Instead, we have two characters with obvious flaws that result in plenty of compatibility issues and even more heated arguments. Gus (Paul Rust) and Mickey (Gillian Jacobs) are nearly opposites. Gus is an archetypal nice guy, straight edge with a tendency to care a bit too much. Mickey is a Love and Sex Addict and an Alcoholic and is often a bit self-destructive. Despite their obvious lack of compatibility, they are somehow able to work past these barriers and develop a strong warmth for each other. I’m often uncertain as to why. Nothing about these two characters is perfect. Instead, we’re often watching uncomfortable arguments where they oust each

“Love” portrays a more honest story of courtship, without using tired archetypes found in every other romantic comedy I’ve seen. Instead, we have two characters with obvious flaws that ƒresult in plenty of compatibility issues and even more heated arguments. Gus (Paul Rust) and Mickey (Gillian Jacobs) are nearly opposites. Gus is an archetypal nice guy, straight edge with a tendency to care a bit too much. Mickey is a Love and Sex Addict and an Alcoholic and is often a bit self-destructive. Despite their obvious lack of compatibility, they are somehow able to work past these barriers and develop a strong warmth for each other. I’m often uncertain as to why. Nothing about these two characters is perfect. Instead, we’re often watching uncomfortable arguments where they oust each

Gus (Paul Rust) and Mickey (Gillian Jacobs) are nearly opposites. Gus is an archetypal nice guy, straight edge with a tendency to care a bit too much. Mickey is a Love and Sex Addict and an Alcoholic and is often a bit self-destructive. Despite their obvious lack of compatibility, they are somehow able to work past these barriers and develop a strong warmth for each other. I’m often uncertain as to why.

Nothing about these two characters is perfect. Instead, we’re often watching uncomfortable arguments where they oust each others flaws in a way that is opposite of anyone’s ideal romance. “Love” illustrates plenty of the bad parts of love in a way that feels so honest and sincere, combined with a bit of awkward comedy. Mickey’s friends in long-term committed relationships let us peek into the possible future for Mickey and Gus. The couples are filled with resentment towards each other and bicker often. Yet, I still find myself rooting for the protagonists to achieve even this portrayal of “love.” Overall, the portrayal of love is not a beautiful dream anyone should seek. Instead, it is layered with

Mickey’s friends in long-term committed relationships let us peek into the possible future for Mickey and Gus. The couples are filled with resentment towards each other and bicker often. Yet, I still find myself rooting for the protagonists to achieve even this portrayal of “love.” Overall, the portrayal of love is not a beautiful dream anyone should seek. Instead, it is layered with

Overall, the portrayal of love is not a beautiful dream anyone should seek. Instead, it is layered with conflict between broken adults seeking to find their footing in their worlds. Every scene hints at some delayed disaster that we can’t bear to watch, but can’t turn away from either.

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